Dreams Wiser than Waking: Recent Acquisitions of Native American Prints

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (American, b. 1940), <em>Tribe/Community</em> from the Survival Series, 1996, lithograph. Acquired with funds provided by the Humana Foundation Endowment for American Art, 2008.044.003

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (American, b. 1940), Tribe/Community from the Survival Series, 1996, lithograph. Acquired with funds provided by the Humana Foundation Endowment for American Art, 2008.044.003

Milly and Fritz Kaeser Mestrovic Studio January 20–March 17, 2013

Following the conclusion of the fall exhibition Father Lindesmith’s Collection: History into Art and Anthropology featuring nineteenth-century examples of art and craft, this presentation of contemporary Native American prints illustrates the nexus of traditional themes and modern society. Whether abstract or figural, the works on display reveal a depth of spirit and technical prowess that command our attention.

Mystical landscapes by James Lavadour, decorative allusions to flora by Emmi Whitehorse, and Wendy Red Star’s mixed-media representation of reservation life, among other works, serve to animate the words of Black Elk, a holy man of the Oglala Lakota in 1932: “Sometimes dreams are wiser than waking.”